Understanding how I learned, to keep learning better

2010/02/09 at 22:57 Leave a comment

I’m trying to get a better grasp on how I learn, so that I can focus my efforts to maximize the amount of material I can cover and also so that I can glean the most valuable information from that material. I was homeschooled for grade and high school, so I had a great opportunity to study what I was interested in and I was able to spend a fair amount of time doing things and making observations about those things.Oregon_Trail I was listening to the radio the other day, and they were talking about Scurvy and Vitamin C. It made me think about when I first heard of Scurvy – The Oregon Trail video games.

I played all of the Oregon Trail games, but the third  edition has a special place in my heart, I played this game extensively, and at the time it helped improve my reading comprehension, because the game almost exclusively text based.

For those who never played, the basic point of the game is to successfully take your family across the Oregon trail. You start out buy choosing all of the items you are going to bring on the trail – every thing from butter, to oxen, to bacon.

A common occurrence in all of my adventures in the Oregon Trail was Scurvy. It took me a few trips down the trail, but after loosing several family members to Scurvy I realized that when I brought lots of citrus fruit, there were far fewer occurrences of scurvy.

What did I glean from this trip down memory lane? This is just one example, but I’m finding that I learn from seeing cause and effect. So when I’m trying to grasp a new concept, I try to focus on seeing the cause and the effect.

The example isn’t very relevant in the world we live in today, since we’re almost all getting our 45-95 milligrams of Vitamin C every day, but the take-home message is to understand what part helps you get a concept, and internalize it.

 

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Entry filed under: Homeschooling, Learning.

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